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20130115
20130123
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CSPAN 2
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English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
tradition of inauguration's being held in the capital. that was in 1945, when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. he was the only president of united states to serve more than two terms. his third inauguration was of the capital. his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this is not the opportune time to have an elaborate inauguration. it decided to move the inauguration today in front of the capital. could he do that? he did. the joint inaugural committee was not happy with that decision. the president of united states can decide above and beyond the date and time they're being sworn in, among other things. we move them from the east front to the west front. the crowd had been getting bigger and bigger. one reason to have them on the west front is because you could accommodate more people. if you look to the photographs of the last several inauguration's, you can measure the crowd by how far it goes back. when ronald reagan was the first sworn in, the crowd went back to maybe a block beyond the reflecting pool. with each inauguration, the crowd gets fu
of the president, the precedent that teddy roosevelt established. it's franklin roosevelt and the experience during world war ii that really changes the nature of the office and it's the cold war. the greatest expansion in presidential power throughout our history has taken place during times of war. what happens during the cold war is war is institutionalized. we live in a time of permanent war. it's the president's role as commander in chief that leads to not only the creation of this great apparatus around the executive, but also the expansion of power. this is the one elected person in our constitutional system and during a time of the threat of nuclear war, it's one person who can make decisions. if you're looking at the key turning points, it begins with teddy roosevelt, wilson, franklin roosevelt and then the cold war forges what is now the modern presidency. >> steve, thank you very much. good luck with the special. >> thank you. >>> up next, krystal goes invisible like manti te'o's girlfriend and goes behind enemy lines to give tips or republican as they vf have a strategy session. it was
of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that's the message on this martin luther king day. and he said when times change, so must we. so i think all of those things are right. and he said, you know, it's not what binds this nation together is not the color
. barry pederson will have our cover story. >> i franklin delano roosevelt... >> reporter: 43 men have held the office of president, but only a handful seem to stand out in history's rear view mirror. >> washington, lincoln. reporter: every historian has a list of favorites. >> they had courage. and they had integrity. >> reporter: the presidents who were our greatest leaders and why. later on sunday morning. >> osgood: a presidential limosine it is not but a brand new version of a much belovedded sports car promised fast company for those with a taste of style and speed. lee cowan will be taking us for a test drive. >> reporter: some are describing chevy's new corvette as pure sex. the new sting ray is sleeker, faster and has lines that have some already lining up to get one. >> you're the first outside person. >> am i really? to sit in one of these. reporter: the latest generation of an american icon later on sunday morning. >> osgood: warren buffet is something of an american icon himself. multibillionaire who lives unpretentiously a long way from wall street. this morning rebecca j
: only two presidents have been sworn in on two separate occasions, franklin d. roosevelt and barack obama because of what happened in 2009. swearing in at noon eastern time today for the president, tomorrow is the public ceremony. vice-president joe biden will be sworn in within the next 10 minutes to 15 minutes from his residence. the flag in the center of your screen is the same one used in his ceremonial office. you can see two paintings. one is lincoln delivering his second inaugural address. one of the more memorable second inaugural addresses in history. guest: that is exactly right. the end of the civil war, leaving it the country at a press of this for which direction they could go. in his words, now the story is none, it set the groundwork for what he envisioned. historians have argued about how it was carried out and what may have been one of the world's greatest what ifs, if he had not been assassinated a few days later. let just a couple of miles to the white house, where the vice president and his official residence is located. the first vice-president of the president
, not tyranny, a president, not a king. and the first step of the president, the oath of office. >> i franklin, del nor roosevelt, do somlely swear i. i george walker bush. >> do solemnly swear. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear. >> it's been taken over each president, usually over a bible with the eyes of the world watching. >> the office is the honor and the responsibility that is bestowed upon one individual to protect the united states, to protect the citizens of the united states, to honor the ideals of the constitution. >> george washington first added so help me god to the oath, a tradition president obammal continue as he takes that pledge once more on abraham lincoln's bible. our first president made a 250 mile journey on horseback and the nation celebrated a new dawn. >> this was the passing of power to a man who could have been king, but refused it. and then each successive inauguration was a celebration, even to today, to obama's inauguration, it's a celebration of that fact that twee didn't make our chief executive king. he wouldn't be a kick. he would pass it on. >> we
with the first one you have noted for us, involves franklin delano roosevelt. >> let's listen. >> my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into-- >> and that's interesting, because there was 1933 at the depression was on everybody's mind and everybody was afraid, so, what does he talk about? fear. >> it's a great speech in the sense he didn't get into policy prescriptions, he wasn't going to say i'm going to do this or i'm going to do that. or i have a 20-point plan. he spent the whole speech talking about the fact we need to get a steely resolve and see it through and talked about fear and said that's the only thing to fear, it's not about the future, we're going to be fine. one of the classics. >> steve: meanwhile, let's take a look at john f. kennedy's inaugural back in the '60s. >> our country and all who serve it, and the globe from that-- and truly like the world and so, my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. and
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)